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I'm Hayley. Welcome to my blog! I share my adventures in urban food, travel and fitness. Enjoy your stay!

One Night in Florence, Italy

One Night in Florence, Italy

I'd heard the most wonderful things about Florence. Called Firenze locally, the capital of Italy's Tuscany region is 280 kilometres (170 miles) or three hours drive from Rome. Friends everywhere had told me how beautiful the city was, filled with Renaissance architecture, paintings and sculpture. I was therefore thrilled when my boyfriend and I's journey from Italy's Cinque Terre to Santorini, Greece would include a night in Florence. To be precise, we'd have just 12 hours to see all we could. 

Given we hadn't planned on stopping in Florence, I considered any sightseeing a bonus. However, the city is easy to get around on foot and lots of attractions are open until 9pm or later making it surprisingly easy to see a lot in a short amount of time. Here's what we covered in one night:

 

2pm - hotel check-in

A friend who'd lived in Florence recommended we stay around the Duomo area as it was central, there were lots of eateries and attractions nearby, and it was close to the main train station. Given our short stay, we booked the mid-range Residenza d'Epoca Borgi Albizi (AU$190/night) just 15 minutes walk from the train station. We found the address without any problems but inside it was a little tricky to find reception. Our room was also up several flights of stairs (post-Cinque Terre hiking!) but such is Europe.

The room was spacious although it looked partially refurbished - the wardrobe was modern and huge, while the bathroom revealed the building's true age. Staff were helpful in recommending good nightlife spots (see 'dinner' below). Address: Borgo Albizi, 14, Firenze | Website

Pana e Toscano: getting a Tuscan sandwich is an experience not to be missed! 

Pana e Toscano: getting a Tuscan sandwich is an experience not to be missed! 

2.15pm - sandwich

For every person who raved about Florence's art, there was another who said our visit had to include a Tuscan sandwich. Think of a thick slab of focaccia stuffed with as much antipasti as you can handle. We'd been recommended the famous All’Antico Vinaio in "sandwich alley" (Via dei Neri), but told to expect long lines. Instead, we went to the less busy but (according to our hotel) equally as good Pana e Toscano (Borgo Degli Albizi 13). I was ecstatic to see a vegan sandwich on the menu (€5) while my boyfriend went for more traditional fillings. Either way, you'll be stuffed! 

2.30pm - Duomo

The Duomo: a grand, imposing cathedral in the city centre.

The Duomo: a grand, imposing cathedral in the city centre.

The Duomo is the most famous landmark in Florence. The 15th century cathedral dominates the city's skyline and is the third largest church in the world. It's free to visit the cathedral or for €15, you can access all areas (the dome, museum, crypt etc). If you want to climb the dome's 463 steps, you'll need to make a reservation (free). Visiting in mid-May, there were long lines everywhere so we simply walked around the outside. It was still impressive! There were lines gathering at another nearby attraction too - you can create your own ice cream at the Magnum Pleasure Store for €4.50.

Address: Piazza Duomo| Opening hours: Generally 10am - 5pm | Website

3pm - mercato centrale

Tuscan sandwich: my bean-heavy vegan option (€5).

Tuscan sandwich: my bean-heavy vegan option (€5).

My boyfriend and I were still full from our lunchtime focaccia, but we wandered to the Mercarto Centrale anyway. The first floor is full of Italian meats, cheese, pasta and fresh produce. There's a few liquor outlets too. The second floor is a vibrant food hall, complete with wine bars and a flash cooking school. This place was a gastronomic heaven! I made a note to book a class if I'm ever in Florence again (and to get accommodation with a kitchen!).

Address: Via dell'Ariento, 50123 Firenze | Website

4pm - Ponte Vecchio 

Everyone said I had to see the famed Ponte Vecchio bridge. Honestly, I wouldn't bother unless you're seriously into medieval history or architecture. It's not particularly attractive from a distance and the walk across is brief, crowded and lined with jewellery sellers. I had a much better time two minutes away at Il Papiro. This paper store has several outlets across Europe but the Florence store has been in the same family for five generations. Be sure to visit the room at the back for a paper printing demonstration. You can buy hand printed paper by the sheet, or grab a packet of offcuts for €17. Address: Via Guicciardini, 47r | Website

Signorvino: resting our feet at a wine bar overlooking the Arno River.

Signorvino: resting our feet at a wine bar overlooking the Arno River.

5pm - Aperitif 

By now, my boyfriend and I were pretty tired. We'd drank a lot of vino on our last night in Cinque Terre and then caught a 9am train and travelled five hours to reach Florence. We rested our feet and minds at Signorvino, overlooking the river. The venue sells take away wine as well as a range of wines by the glass and bottle. Staff didn't judge me for ordering a much-needed Diet Coke before returning to wine. Its location between Pinto Vecchio and Piazza Michelangelo (see below) makes it an ideal stop before sunset. Make a reservation if you go at dinner time as the venue is relatively small and got busy as we left.

Address: Via de' Bardi, 46R, 50125 Firenze | Website

Giardino delle Rose: this small garden is worth a stop when visiting nearby Piazza Michelangelo (free entry).

Giardino delle Rose: this small garden is worth a stop when visiting nearby Piazza Michelangelo (free entry).

6pm - Piazza Michelangelo

One thing I seek in every city is a lookout. Florence boasts Piazza Michelangelo, a large open air area on a hill where you'll find performers, a restaurant, some souvenir stands and a few food vans. It's a beautiful spot to watch the sun go down and enjoy an Aperol Spritz. I'm sure you could bring your own beers and picnic if you wanted. To get there, follow the signs along the river and roads. When you see steps, you're close! There's also a rose garden next door that's free and pretty.

8pm - Hotel

We walked back to our hotel to change before dinner. It was only 30 minutes walk from Piazza Michelangelo and we could walk to our next destination too. 

Palazza Vecchio: sweeping views of Florence at night from the Battlement area. 

Palazza Vecchio: sweeping views of Florence at night from the Battlement area. 

9pm - Palazza Vecchio

Palazza Vecchio: the main hall's exquisite ceiling.

Palazza Vecchio: the main hall's exquisite ceiling.

A friend in London had given us the heads up many Florence museums and attractions were open until 9pm or later. Perfect for a couple trying to see it all in a night! We reached Palazza Vecchio (Town Hall) just in time for a 9.30pm tour of the 'Battlement,' a fortress on top of the building. The nighttime views of Florence were a beautiful contrast to the scenes we'd seen from Piazza Michelangelo just hours before. You can peer five floors below through glass too and imagine medieval knights and battles. After our rooftop tour, we wandered through the museum for another 45 minutes. The map room, showing continents as imagined in the 15th Century was an absolute highlight, as was the elegant ceiling in the main hall. The museum ("museo") entrance was €10, with an extra €4 for the battlement. Address: Piazza della Signoria | Website

10.30pm - dinner

Borgo Antico: delicious food and perfect for people watching.

Borgo Antico: delicious food and perfect for people watching.

Both our hotel reception and a friend had recommended we head south of the river for dinner and nightlife. We literally had a map with a circle drawn on it, but it's roughly an area just below Ponte Santa Trinita (or around 10 minutes walk from the Ponte Vecchio). We followed the sounds of people and music and grabbed a table at Borgo Antico, facing Piazza Santo Spirito. It was perfect for people watching! 

We ordered a bottle of white wine (€19.50) and scanned the food menu. There were big pizzas, plenty of pastas, large salads, and seafood and meat dishes. My boyfriend chose pizza with spicy salami, capers and mozzarella while I ordered a main of grilled vegetables (exactly what I wanted after days of spaghetti!). Our meals came with delicious wheat bread, olive oil and black olives. The bill was just €51 including the vino. Nearby restaurants began to wind down at midnight although the square stayed busy with people drinking and chatting. I can't remember whether we caught an Uber or walked back to our hotel, so clearly it was a good night! 

Address: Piazza Santo Spirito, 6-red, 50125 | Website

Florence at night: viewed from the top of Palazza Vecchio ("Town Hall").

Florence at night: viewed from the top of Palazza Vecchio ("Town Hall").

1am - Bed Time 

With our stomachs full of wine, pizza and vegetables, we packed our bags and collapsed. It wasn't easy when the alarm went off five hours later, but I'm glad we had a night in Florence! It's a gritty city excentuated by a lot of smokers, but its rich and prosperous history is evident everywhere. I would've loved to visit more museums and art galleries, and more wine bars! But we had a 6.45am cab booked for our 7.30am train to Rome Airport, so we had to say farewell to Firenze. You can read what happened next in How To Get From Cinque Terre to Santorini.

practical info

Getting there

As with most European cities, you can reach Florence by air, rail or road. Florence Airport is 10km (6mi) from the city centre or around 30 minutes drive. An alternative is to fly to Pisa which is 80km (50mi) or about 90 minutes from Florence. As mentioned, it's about about three hours drive from the capital Rome. We caught a train from Cinque Terre to Florence via Pisa, pre-booking through the excellent ticketing website Loco2. The fare was €18.30 each (Monterosso to Pisa €9.90, Pisa to Florence, €8.40). 

Getting around

It's easy to get around Florence on foot, otherwise taxis and Uber are readily available too. The main train station is Firenze Santa Maria Novella (often "Firenze S.M."). It has a restaurant, several cafes (including an allergy friendly one!), and a great bookstore. See my post Getting From Cinque Terre to Santorini for full details. 

Language

It's helpful and polite to know some Italian before you go, although not essential to navigate the city or order food. Check out my post Italy's Incredible Cinque Terre for some handy phrases, or download the free language app Duolingo to practice your Italian before you go! 

QUESTION: When did you maximise a stopover? 

 

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